Love bade me welcome: yet my soul drew back,
Guilty of dust and sin.
But quick-eyed Love, observing me grow slack
From my first entrance in,
Drew nearer to me, sweetly questioning
If I lacked anything.

“A guest,” I answered, “worthy to be here”:
Love said, “You shall be he.”
“I, the unkind, ungrateful? Ah, my dear,
I cannot look on thee.”
Love took my hand, and smiling did reply,
“Who made the eyes but I?”

“Truth, Lord; but I have marred them; let my shame
Go where it doth deserve.”
“And know you not,” says Love, “who bore the blame?”
“My dear, then I will serve.”
“You must sit down,” says Love, “and taste my meat.”
So I did sit and eat.

George Herbert

 

“In 1938 I spent ten days at Solesmes, from Palm Sunday to Easter Tuesday, following all the liturgical services. I was suffering from splitting headaches; each sound hurt me like a blow; by an extreme effort of concentration I was able to rise above this wretched flesh, to leave it to suffer by itself, heaped up in a corner, and to find a pure and perfect joy in the unimaginable beauty of the chanting and the words. This experience enabled me by analogy to get a better understanding of the possibility of loving divine love in the midst of affliction. It goes without saying that in the course of these services the thought of the Passion of Christ entered into my being once and for all.  There was a young English Catholic there from whom I gained my first idea of the supernatural power of the sacraments because of the truly angelic radiance with which he seemed to be clothed after going to communion. Chance—for I always prefer saying chance rather than Providence—made of him a messenger to me. For he told me of the existence of those English poets of the seventeenth century who are named metaphysical. In reading them later on, I discovered the poem of which I read you what is unfortunately a very inadequate translation. It is called “Love”. I learned it by heart. Often, at the culminating point of a violent headache, I make myself say it over, concentrating all my attention upon it and clinging with all my soul to the tenderness it enshrines. I used to think I was merely reciting it as a beautiful poem, but without my knowing it the recitation had the virtue of a prayer. It was during one of these recitations that, as I told you, Christ himself came down and took possession of me… Moreover, in this sudden possession of me by Christ, neither my senses nor my imagination had any part; I only felt in the midst of my suffering the presence of a love, like that which one can read in the smile on a beloved face.” 

Simone Weil, from a letter quoted in the anthology Waiting on God

 

 

When George Herbert died, in 1633, at the age of 39, “Love” was unpublished.

Shortly before his death, he sent a collection of poems to his friend, Nicholas Ferrar, asking him to publish them if he considered that they might help “any poor dejected soul”. Ferrar, it seems, thought they might, for they were published that same year.

Herbert could not have imagined that, some three centuries later, in 1938, one of them could have found its way into the hands of an anguished young French intellectual named Simone Weil.

It is as if he reached across the centuries to hand it to her, and thus they became friends across time.

Now we are challenged and inspired by both George Herbert and Simone Weil.

 

Anything we write

anything we do

—no matter how small, no matter how obscure—

has the possibility of doing good in ways we cannot possibly imagine.

Do the next good thing!

 

Simone_Weil_05herbert

Simone Weil (left) and George Herbert (right, detail of a portrait by William Dyce).

 

 

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